Thinking Without Thinking In The Victorian Novel

Thinking Without Thinking in the Victorian Novel PDF
Author: Vanessa L. Ryan
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421405911
Size: 74.25 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 243
View: 4045

Get Book



Book Description: In Thinking without Thinking in the Victorian Novel, Vanessa L. Ryan demonstrates how both the form and the experience of reading novels played an important role in ongoing debates about the nature of consciousness during the Victorian era. Revolutionary developments in science during the mid- and late nineteenth century—including the discoveries and writings of Herbert Spencer, William Carpenter, and George Henry Lewes—had a vital impact on fiction writers of the time. Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Henry James read contributions in what we now call cognitive science that asked, "what is the mind?" These Victorian fiction writers took a crucial step, asking how we experience our minds, how that experience relates to our behavior and questions of responsibility, how we can gain control over our mental reflexes, and finally how fiction plays a special role in understanding and training our minds. Victorian fiction writers focus not only on the question of how the mind works but also on how it seems to work and how we ought to make it work. Ryan shows how the novelistic emphasis on dynamic processes and functions—on the activity of the mind, rather than its structure or essence—can also be seen in some of the most exciting and comprehensive scientific revisions of the understanding of "thinking" in the Victorian period. This book studies the way in which the mind in the nineteenth-century view is embedded not just in the body but also in behavior, in social structures, and finally in fiction.

Thinking Without Thinking In The Victorian Novel

Thinking without Thinking in the Victorian Novel PDF
Author: Vanessa L. Ryan
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421406470
Size: 20.28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 5466

Get Book



Book Description: In Thinking without Thinking in the Victorian Novel, Vanessa L. Ryan demonstrates how both the form and the experience of reading novels played an important role in ongoing debates about the nature of consciousness during the Victorian era. Revolutionary developments in science during the mid- and late nineteenth century—including the discoveries and writings of Herbert Spencer, William Carpenter, and George Henry Lewes—had a vital impact on fiction writers of the time. Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Henry James read contributions in what we now call cognitive science that asked, "what is the mind?" These Victorian fiction writers took a crucial step, asking how we experience our minds, how that experience relates to our behavior and questions of responsibility, how we can gain control over our mental reflexes, and finally how fiction plays a special role in understanding and training our minds. Victorian fiction writers focus not only on the question of how the mind works but also on how it seems to work and how we ought to make it work. Ryan shows how the novelistic emphasis on dynamic processes and functions—on the activity of the mind, rather than its structure or essence—can also be seen in some of the most exciting and comprehensive scientific revisions of the understanding of "thinking" in the Victorian period. This book studies the way in which the mind in the nineteenth-century view is embedded not just in the body but also in behavior, in social structures, and finally in fiction. -- Nancy Armstrong, Duke University

The Victorian Novel And The Space Of Art

The Victorian Novel and the Space of Art PDF
Author: Dehn Gilmore
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107044227
Size: 20.55 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 260
View: 4345

Get Book



Book Description: "This interdisciplinary study argues for the vital importance of visual culture as a force shaping the Victorian novel's formal development and reading history. It shows how authors like Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Wilkie Collins and Thomas Hardy borrowed language and conceptual formations from art world spaces - the art market, the museum, the large-scale exhibition, and art critical discourse - not only when they chose certain subjects or refined certain aspects of realism, but also when they tried to adapt various genres of the novel for a new and newly vociferous mass audience. Quandaries specific to new forms of public display affected authors' sense of their relationship with their own public. Debates about how best to appreciate a new mass of visual information impacted authors' sense of how people read, and consequently the development of particular novel forms like the multi-plot novel, the historical novel, the sensation novel, and fin-de-siáecle fiction"--

New Women In The Late Victorian Novel

 New Women  in the Late Victorian Novel PDF
Author: Lloyd Fernando
Publisher: University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press, c[1977]
ISBN:
Size: 52.53 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 168
View: 481

Get Book



Book Description: Most of the major challenges of the women's liberation movement, argues this book, were reflected in late 19th-century fiction, and this concern had a significant effect on the art of the novel. Although primarily a work of criticism, the presentation is informed more than is customary by social history since the period covered was "a particularly tumultuous phase of the women's liberation movement" throughout Europe. Professor Fernando's book was inspired by dissatisfaction with both the literary and social history of the late Victorian era. For one thing, histories of the women's emancipation movement are presented in conventional political terms, neglecting "the degree of imaginative adjustment individuals were called upon to make in response to the movement"--leaving that to the best novelists. For another, there is a common assumption that the interest of the major English novelists in the women's issue "was marginal to their art compared to their minor contemporaries." This book demonstrates that the ideas generated by the women's movement not only contributed to the abandonment of older ethical values, but also materially affected the greatest fictional achievements. Following an introduction relating the novel to ideology in the period 1865-95, Professor Fernando presents chapters on George Eliot, Meredith, Moore, Gissing, and Hardy. He concludes with an epilogue showing echoes from these novelists in the writings of current supporters of the women's movement. The result is a work establishing links between an influential historical movement and the development of a modern literary genre.

Egoism And Self Discovery In The Victorian Novel

Egoism and Self discovery in the Victorian Novel PDF
Author: John Halperin
Publisher: New York : B. Franklin
ISBN:
Size: 69.69 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Egoism in literature
Languages : en
Pages : 293
View: 4811

Get Book



Book Description:

Why Victorian Literature Still Matters

Why Victorian Literature Still Matters PDF
Author: Philip Davis
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN:
Size: 60.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 171
View: 6255

Get Book



Book Description: "Rather than emphasizing Victorian literature as an historical and reassuring body of knowledge, Davis explains its centrality for contemporary readers as an important mode of thinking and feeling, and provides a gateway of analysis into the popular prose and poetry of the Victorian Age. Why Victorian Literature Still Matters is a personal manifesto, inviting readers to discover what it is that really moves them in a book. The author offers readers the encouragement to find out what Victorian literature means for them and how it relates to our wider human existence."--BOOK JACKET.

Ways Of Thinking About Law In Four Nineteenth Century British Novels

Ways of Thinking about Law in Four Nineteenth century British Novels PDF
Author: Deborah B. Luyster
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 36.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : English fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 686
View: 1114

Get Book



Book Description:

The Articulation Of Science In The Neo Victorian Novel

The Articulation of Science in the Neo Victorian Novel PDF
Author: Daniel Candel Bormann
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 16.31 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 335
View: 2032

Get Book



Book Description: Beginning with an introduction to Ansgar Nünning's systematization of the historical novel, Daniel Candel Bormann's study offers a poetics of science in the contemporary historical, and more specifically, neo-Victorian novel.

The Victorian Novel

The Victorian novel PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 32.63 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : English fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 78
View: 6764

Get Book



Book Description:

Science And Religion In Neo Victorian Novels

Science and Religion in Neo Victorian Novels PDF
Author: John Glendening
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134088345
Size: 51.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 272
View: 4502

Get Book



Book Description: Criticism about the neo-Victorian novel — a genre of historical fiction that re-imagines aspects of the Victorian world from present-day perspectives — has expanded rapidly in the last fifteen years but given little attention to the engagement between science and religion. Of great interest to Victorians, this subject often appears in neo-Victorian novels including those by such well-known authors as John Fowles, A. S. Byatt, Graham Swift, and Mathew Kneale. This book discusses novels in which nineteenth-century science, including geology, paleontology, and evolutionary theory, interacts with religion through accommodations, conflicts, and crises of faith. In general, these texts abandon conventional religion but retain the ethical connectedness and celebration of life associated with spirituality at its best. Registering the growth of nineteenth-century secularism and drawing on aspects of the romantic tradition and ecological thinking, they honor the natural world without imagining that it exists for humans or functions in reference to human values. In particular, they enact a form of wonderment: the capacity of the mind to make sense of, creatively adapt, and enjoy the world out of which it has evolved — in short, to endow it with meaning. Protagonists who come to experience reality in this expansive way release themselves from self-anxiety and alienation. In this book, Glendening shows how, by intermixing past and present, fact and fiction, neo-Victorian narratives, with a few instructive exceptions, manifest this pattern.