Secularism In Antebellum America

Secularism in Antebellum America PDF
Author: John Lardas Modern
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226533255
Size: 41.47 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 3347

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Book Description: Ghosts. Railroads. Sing Sing. Sex machines. These are just a few of the phenomena that appear in John Lardas Modern’s pioneering account of religion and society in nineteenth-century America. This book uncovers surprising connections between secular ideology and the rise of technologies that opened up new ways of being religious. Exploring the eruptions of religion in New York’s penny presses, the budding fields of anthropology and phrenology, and Moby-Dick, Modern challenges the strict separation between the religious and the secular that remains integral to discussions about religion today. Modern frames his study around the dread, wonder, paranoia, and manic confidence of being haunted, arguing that experiences and explanations of enchantment fueled secularism’s emergence. The awareness of spectral energies coincided with attempts to tame the unruly fruits of secularism—in the cultivation of a spiritual self among Unitarians, for instance, or in John Murray Spear’s erotic longings for a perpetual motion machine. Combining rigorous theoretical inquiry with beguiling historical arcana, Modern unsettles long-held views of religion and the methods of narrating its past.

Realist Ecstasy

Realist Ecstasy PDF
Author: Lindsay V. Reckson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479803324
Size: 50.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 336
View: 2489

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Book Description: Explores the intersection and history of American literary realism and the performance of spiritual and racial embodiment. Recovering a series of ecstatic performances in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American realism, Realist Ecstasy travels from camp meetings to Native American ghost dances to storefront church revivals to explore realism’s relationship to spiritual experience. In her approach to realism as both an unruly archive of performance and a wide-ranging repertoire of media practices—including literature, photography, audio recording, and early film—Lindsay V. Reckson argues that the real was repetitively enacted and reenacted through bodily practice. Realist Ecstasy demonstrates how the realist imagining of possessed bodies helped construct and naturalize racial difference, while excavating the complex, shifting, and dynamic possibilities embedded in ecstatic performance: its production of new and immanent forms of being beside. Across her readings of Stephen Crane, James Weldon Johnson, and Nella Larsen, among others, Reckson triangulates secularism, realism, and racial formation in the post-Reconstruction moment. Realist Ecstasy shows how post-Reconstruction realist texts mobilized gestures—especially the gestures associated with religious ecstasy—to racialize secularism itself. Reckson offers us a distinctly new vision of American realism as a performative practice, a sustained account of how performance lives in and through literary archives, and a rich sense of how closely secularization and racialization were linked in Jim Crow America.

Old Canaan In A New World

Old Canaan in a New World PDF
Author: Elizabeth Fenton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479866369
Size: 76.58 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 272
View: 2994

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Book Description: Were indigenous Americans descendants of the lost tribes of Israel? From the moment Europeans realized Columbus had landed in a place unknown to them in 1492, they began speculating about how the Americas and their inhabitants fit into the Bible. For many, the most compelling explanation was the Hebraic Indian theory, which proposed that indigenous Americans were the descendants of the ten lost tribes of Israel. For its proponents, the theory neatly explained why this giant land and its inhabitants were not mentioned in the Biblical record. In Old Canaan in a New World, Elizabeth Fenton shows that though the Hebraic Indian theory may seem far-fetched today, it had a great deal of currency and significant influence over a very long period of American history. Indeed, at different times the idea that indigenous Americans were descended from the lost tribes of Israel was taken up to support political and religious positions on diverse issues including Christian millennialism, national expansion, trade policies, Jewish rights, sovereignty in the Americas, and scientific exploration. Through analysis of a wide collection of writings—from religious texts to novels—Fenton sheds light on a rarely explored but important part of religious discourse in early America. As the Hebraic Indian theory evolved over the course of two centuries, it revealed how religious belief and national interest intersected in early American history.

Bible Culture And Authority In The Early United States

Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States PDF
Author: Seth Perry
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691179131
Size: 10.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 216
View: 2813

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Book Description: Early Americans claimed that they looked to "the Bible alone" for authority, but the Bible was never, ever alone. Bible Culture and Authority in the Early United States is a wide-ranging exploration of the place of the Christian Bible in America in the decades after the Revolution. Attending to both theoretical concerns about the nature of scriptures and to the precise historical circumstances of a formative period in American history, Seth Perry argues that the Bible was not a "source" of authority in early America, as is often said, but rather a site of authority: a cultural space for editors, commentators, publishers, preachers, and readers to cultivate authoritative relationships. While paying careful attention to early national bibles as material objects, Perry shows that "the Bible" is both a text and a set of relationships sustained by a universe of cultural practices and assumptions. Moreover, he demonstrates that Bible culture underwent rapid and fundamental changes in the early nineteenth century as a result of developments in technology, politics, and religious life. At the heart of the book are typical Bible readers, otherwise unknown today, and better-known figures such as Zilpha Elaw, Joseph Smith, Denmark Vesey, and Ellen White, a group that includes men and women, enslaved and free, Baptists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Methodists, Mormons, Presbyterians, and Quakers. What they shared were practices of biblical citation in writing, speech, and the performance of their daily lives. While such citation contributed to the Bible's authority, it also meant that the meaning of the Bible constantly evolved as Americans applied it to new circumstances and identities.

Americanist Approaches To The Book Of Mormon

Americanist Approaches to the Book of Mormon PDF
Author: Elizabeth Fenton
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190221925
Size: 28.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 456
View: 5367

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Book Description: As the sacred text of a modern religious movement of global reach, The Book of Mormon has undeniable historical significance. That significance, this volume shows, is inextricable from the intricacy of its literary form and the audacity of its historical vision. This landmark collection brings together a diverse range of scholars in American literary studies and related fields to definitively establish The Book of Mormon as an indispensable object of Americanist inquiry not least because it is, among other things, a form of Americanist inquiry in its own right--a creative, critical reading of "America." Drawing on formalist criticism, literary and cultural theory, book history, religious studies, and even anthropological field work, Americanist Approaches to The Book of Mormon captures as never before the full dimensions and resonances of this "American Bible."

Village Atheists

Village Atheists PDF
Author: Leigh Eric Schmidt
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691183112
Size: 64.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 360
View: 6040

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Book Description: A much-maligned minority throughout American history, atheists have been cast as a threat to the nation’s moral fabric, barred from holding public office, and branded as irreligious misfits in a nation chosen by God. Yet village atheists—as these godless freethinkers came to be known by the close of the nineteenth century—were also hailed for their gutsy dissent from stultifying pieties and for posing a necessary secularist challenge to the entanglements of church and state. In Village Atheists, Leigh Eric Schmidt explores the complex cultural terrain that unbelievers have long had to navigate in their fight to secure equal rights and liberties in American public life. He rebuilds the history of American secularism from the ground up, giving flesh and blood to these outspoken infidels. Village Atheists demonstrates that the secularist vision for the United States proved to be anything but triumphant in a country where faith and citizenship were—and still are—closely interwoven.

American Life

American Life PDF
Author: Macmillan Publishing
Publisher: MacMillan Reference Library
ISBN:
Size: 30.16 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 645
View: 360

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Book Description: Entries explore the lives of ordinary people, the forces shaping their everyday existence, and the connections between social groups

Evangelicals And Politics In Antebellum America

Evangelicals and Politics in Antebellum America PDF
Author: Richard Carwardine
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780870499746
Size: 57.91 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 487
View: 6193

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Book Description: "A book of uncommon significance, Evangelicals and Politics in Antebellum America compels us to rethink the causes for the Civil War and once again place the moral issue of slavery at the heart of the matter". -- Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Journal of Southern History "This superbly researched and expertly written book makes a signal contribution to American history as well as to the history of religion". -- Mark Noll, Christianity Today "Carwardine's book is a major contribution to our understanding of pre-Civil War politics.... Few, after reading this sophisticated account, will deny the important role evangelicals played in shaping mid-nineteenth-century American political culture".-Curtis D. Johnson, American Historical Review This book, first published in 1993 to great acclaim, examines the relationship between evangelical Protestant piety and political life in the critical twenty years before the Civil War. It is the first study to address directly the questions of how effectively evangelicals engaged in secular politics, how far they fashioned American political culture and party developments, and how instrumental they were in shaping the lines of sectional antagonism. Richard Carwardine explores the complex character of the evangelical movement and its impact during the antebellum era. He reveals how evangelicals, both North and South, re-inforced the drive toward two-party, adversarial politics by encouraging voting and responsible citizenship, pressuring politicians, and forcing questions of education, the removal of Native Americans, war, drink, and, above all, slavery onto the political agenda. This book goes further than any previous study to argue that religion was thecoin of politics in the early 1800s and that the roots of the Civil War lay in religious as well as secular factors.

Africana Studies

Africana Studies PDF
Author: Mario Joaquim Azevedo
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 23.31 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 582
View: 6308

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Book Description: The new edition of Africana Studies: A Survey of Africa and the African Diaspora is an update of the second edition (1998) and incorporates new chapters that include expanded coverage of issues on women, health, terrorism, the African Union, and many others, as well as the most recent theories and methods in Africana studies. To date, Africana Studies remains the most comprehensive and most suitable text for both teachers and students interested in Africa and the Diaspora in the US, the Caribbean, Afro-Latin-America, and elsewhere.The book is divided into five parts: the state of the art of Africana studies; the evolution of the history of black people; analysis of the contributions of the black world; the present and future status of these peoples; and the societies and values of black people. The book also includes a chronology of significant events in the history of peoples of African descent and a number of maps.

The Advocates Of Peace In Antebellum America

The Advocates of Peace in Antebellum America PDF
Author: Valarie H. Ziegler
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 59.55 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 241
View: 2763

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Book Description: "A revealing study of the worldview of nineteenth-century American peace activists, this book chronicles the political and intellectual development of the two major antebellum peace movements. The American Peace Society, a moderate group, understood peace work in the context of a positive view of the role of the state and social institutions in restraining war. It aimed to work through the institutions of church and state to achieve peace. The Garrisonian nonresistants of the New England Non-Resistant Society constituted a radical group which advocated the individual's complete separation from all institutions and a strict adherence to the example of Christ's life and teachings." "As Valarie H. Ziegler shows, the task of establishing peace in a culture where institutionalized forms of violence such as slavery were legally protected proved endlessly frustrating for both groups. As they faced the questions raised by such diverse events as the lynching of abolitionists, the women's rights movement, the Mexican War, the Fugitive Slave Law, and John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, the advocates of peace faced the challenge of reformulating their ethical models, in hope of finding some way to reconcile peace, liberty, and social order." "Despite their differences in temperament, both groups were initially convinced that the New Testament's admonition to love one's enemies and refuse to return evil for evil was an absolute command. They believed they were called to practice peace without regard for the consequences. As civil unrest raged over slavery, however, the advocates discovered that they did care about consequences. They wanted to abolish slavery and create a just social order." "With the coming of the Civil War, the peace activists faced their most difficult task: choosing between a violent struggle to free the slaves and dutiful obedience to the Sermon on the Mount."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved